What to Look for When Choosing A Florida Direct Cremation Facility

When your loved one dies, it can be an overwhelming process to figure out what to do next. First, you need to make sure you loved one doesn’t have prearrangements for their cremation. If they do not have prearrangements, you need to start by figuring out how you want to handle your loved one’s direct cremation in Florida.

A direct cremation is becoming more popular day by day in Florida, especially in the south west region of Florida. This is due to the lower costs of direct cremations and also the current pandemic crisis which does not allow for congregation of people to celebrate the life of a loved one. In a direct cremation, you do not have a funeral where you view the body. Instead, your direct cremation facility will pick the body up and have it cremated directly.

Once you have figured out that you want a direct cremation in Florida for your loved one, you need to figure out which direct cremation facility you want to go with. This can be the trickiest part of the whole direct cremation process. When you google direct cremation St. Petersburg or direct cremation Trinity, you will see pages upon pages of direct cremation facilities pop up. Here are a few tips and “red flags” to be aware of and ask questions about:

cremation red flags

Very Low Prices

  • When facilities offer cremations around the $500-$600 mark there should be some alarm bells going off in your head. Most of the time, they advertise a much lower price but do not include costs like transportation, urns, or will even add unnecessary additional fees that can bring your final total easily over $2000. If something like that happens to you, know that within the state of Florida, no facility is allowed to hold a body once they pick it up. If you are not happy, its within your rights to move to another facility. You should aim for a cremation facility that starts offering prices in the high $700-$1000 range. For example, our simple cremation is $795 and it includes transportation, an urn and an obituary. https://goinghomecremations.com/affordable-cremation-services/

Crematory

Their Headquarters

  • We have been seeing an uptick in corporate direct cremation facilities that are not even located in Florida. That should be concerning. You want a facility where their headquarters are based in Florida to make sure they are following all rules around direct cremations in Florida.

 

Look Up Their Reviews on Google and Yelp

  • Please look at a company’s reviews before you choose to go with them. We have seen many families be shocked at the lack of customer service or upcharges because they did not review their direct cremation facility, they chose in Florida first. For example, our facility Going Home Cremations, has over 24 five stars Google reviews. In fact, we only have five-star reviews, and its important you go with a facility that has similar numbers.

 

Ask Them How Long They’ve Been in Business

  • We are also seeing more facilities being started by people who do not really understand the Florida direct cremation industry. It’s imperative that your facility knows the ins and outs of each city they are in. When you have a direct cremation in Florida, there are special rules for each area. For example, direct cremations in St. Petersburg can have different county fees than direct cremations in Port Charlotte. That’s why it is so important that you have a facility that can handle each city like they have lived there for their whole life. At Going Home Cremations, we have been in Southwest Florida doing cremations for over 20 years, and know the ins and outs of all the areas we service.

Cremation Urn

At Going Home Cremations, our main goal is helping families because compassion is at the heart of our care. If you are out of our service area but just want to ask questions on some facilities you are looking at for a cremation in Florida, call us! We will try and help guide you to pick a cremation facility that is dignified but offering affordable cremations.

Cremation: What to Do with The Ashes Afterwards.

 

After your loved one has had a cremation, the next step in the process is for you and your family to decide what you should do with the cremated ashes. There are many options for a family when it comes to what to do with cremated ashes.

First things first, you need to decide if you will have cremation facility handle the ashes or your family once the cremation is completed. For example, At Going Home Cremations, we can scatter the ashes of a loved one for you if you do not want to do it yourself. There are many places we are able to scatter ashes including the ocean.

If you will be taking the cremated ashes once the cremation is completed, then you must decide what you will do the cremated remains. There are a few options:

Keep the Ashes at Home:

You can purchase an urn and keep the urn with the ashes at home. This is what many people typically do when they have a loved one cremated. You can also split the ashes, so many family members can have ashes in their home. We would suggest arranging ashes being split with the cremation facility you are using. The facility can also put the ashes in each urn for you, sometimes at little or no cost.

Cremated remains ashes

Bury the Ashes or Put Them in A Columbarium:

You can bring the urn to a cemetery and have it put into a niche or family plot. Cremation facilities will not be able to help you with this part, you will have to go to a cemetery to purchase space. The costs for doing this can be significant so we suggest shopping around to a few cemeteries or even seeing if individual sellers are selling their plots. You can either bury the urn or put it into a columbarium.

Scatter the Ashes:

You can scatter the ashes or even just scatter part of the ashes. Scattering rules and regulations depend on where you are, so check out of blog that speaks more about it here: https://goinghomecremations.com/scatterings-ashes-in-florida/. There are many options when It comes to scattering ashes. You can scatter ashes in the sea, or even a state park. You are also able to scatter ashes on private land if you get permission.

Scattering Ashes

Make the Ashes into Diamonds

You can make the cremated remains in diamonds. It’s an expensive process but in the end, you get real diamonds out of the process. We can help you with this at Going Home Cremations. Cremation diamonds are real diamonds made from human cremation ashes. Firstly, the carbon of the cremation ashes is purified. Then, it is pressed into a cremation diamond with high pressure and high temperature (HPHT) machine.

Add the Ashes to a Manmade Reef:

You can add your loved one’s ashes to a man-made reef called Eternal Reef. https://www.eternalreefs.com

Plant the Ashes: 

There are different companies that offer the ability for you to plant your loved one’s ashes with a tree. The types of trees options vary from Maple Trees all the way to Palm trees.

Turn the Ashes into Ammo:

We work with a company called Holy Smokes, and they are able to turn your loved one’s ashes into ammo. You can even get colored ammo for military gun salutes. http://www.myholysmoke.com

Send the Ashes to Space:

There is a company that offers different options to send cremated ashes to space, they are called Celestis. https://www.celestis.com

No matter what you choose to do with your loved ones cremated ashes, know at Going Home Cremation, we offer you the most affordable direct cremation service in Florida. https://www.goinghomecremations.com 

The Rules of Shipping and Flying with Cremated Remains and Ashes

Shipping Cremated AshesShipping and Flying with Cremated Ashes and Remains

It happens almost every day, the untimely death of a family member while out of state or even the country. Or a loved one dies in Florida while in retirement, but you live outside of Florida. What do you do when something like that happens and you want your loved one’s ashes sent some where different than where they passed? You are most likely going to have to fly or ship the cremated remains to their destination.  There are many rules and regulations surrounding shipping ashes nationally or flying with them domestically.

 

Shipping Cremated Remains:

Once your loved one has been cremated; you do have the option of shipping their ashes once the direct cremation is done. However, there are many rules and regulations surrounding shipping ashes. First, cremated remains are only allowed to be shipped via USPS. They must be shipped overnight via Priority Mail Express. You must have something called a label 139 to accompany the ashes that will be shipped. The priority mail express will provide tracking for the shipment. You can also ship ashes internationally via USPS Priority Mail Express International. However, you must ensure the country will accept cremated remains. Also Priority Mail Express International must be an option to ship cremated ashes to.

 

The packaging of shipping cremated ashes is very important with a few requirements. If you use your direct crematory to help you ship the ashes, they should be able to do it all for you. If not, check out this link to UPS shipping guidelines for cremated remains: https://about.usps.com/publications/pub139.pdf. At Going Home Cremation, we offer the service of shipping cremated ashes for our families. The USPS prices tend to vary between $100-$300 depending on where they cremated remains need to be shipped to.

Flying with cremated ashes

Flying with Cremated Remains:

You are legally allowed to fly with cremated ashes as long as you follow some specific guidelines. In the US, most airlines will allow you to fly with cremated remains, but each carrier has a different policy and you must double check their policy. If you are bringing the cremated remains on as a carry on, you must ensure that the urn holding the remains can go through the X-Ray machine, and allow TSA to see the full contents. Stone urns, metal urns, ceramic urns and any other material that is not easily x-rayed will not be allowed. Plastic, cardboard, and most wood urns are okay for the X-ray machine and should be allowed through the TSA security check point. The TSA will not open any urns or examine cremated remains, even if granted permission, so ensure cremation ashes are packed properly prior to going through security.

 

In Florida, when you are flying with cremated remains, you need two documents: A burial transit permit and a certificate of cremation. The crematory you work with should be able to provide you with both items with ease. You can also put cremated ashes in your luggage, and we suggest that if you do so, attach a copy of the burial transit permit and certificate of cremation to the ashes in your luggage. If you are flying with cremated ashes as a carry on, you should bring both of these documents with you in case there are any questions. If you have any more questions, contact TSA and check out this link about their guidelines: https://www.tsa.gov/travel/security-screening/whatcanibring/items/cremated-remains.

 

Shipping cremated ashes

 

At Going Home Cremations, we can help. We are able to help you ship or fly with you your loved one’s cremated ashes. Visit our website https://www.GoingHomeCremations.com or call 941-320-1179.

The Differences Between Direct Cremation and Cremation

cremation urn

At Going Home Cremations, we know it can be very confusing to understand the differences between what a direct cremation is and what a cremation is. At the time your loved one passes in a hospital or hospice, there are so many options on what to do once your loved one passes. One of the first things you will realize is you have the option between a burial and a cremation. If you pick a cremation, you then need to figure out if you want a direct cremation or a cremation.

Cremation

The biggest different between a direct cremation and a cremation is that a cremation is MUCH MORE expensive. This is due to a normal funeral being involved with a cremation. With a cremation, the body is brought from the hospital or hospice and sent directly to a funeral home. The funeral home then performs normal funeral body preparations like embalming, dressing and body preparations for cremation viewings. This use to be the most popular way to handle a cremation, but due to costs that can be upwards of $7000 compared to $1000 for a direct cremation, it is falling out of favor.

cremation

The cost are so high due to families paying for a funeral director, casket, embalming, and then on top of that a cremation, when all is said and done.  Also, the environmental concerns of embalming have also taken cremation out of favor compared to direct cremation. With a normal cremation, there is the option of a viewing for a family, like what would be expected if a burial was chosen

In a cremation, a family can choose to have a funeral like what would occur in a burial or have a viewing. This will change the costs for a cremation as well. In a viewing, there is less body preparation compared to a full funeral. With a viewing, it is possible to not have the body embalmed. Whereas, a normal funeral with a cremation, there is an embalming.

Direct Cremation

In a direct cremation, the body is taken from where the person died, directly to the crematory. This is the biggest difference between the two, because in a direct cremation the body is not prepared for viewing. This can save families thousands of dollars as well as make the cremation process faster for families in case they need death certificates for estate matters.

Once the body is at the crematory, the cremation process is very fast, with the actual cremation only taking between one to three hours. Once the body is cremated, the rest of the direct cremation process is very fast. One additional advantage of the direct cremation is that once the cremation is completed, the family can still have a service but save considerable amount of time and not be on a time crunch for scheduling a service.

Cremation Urn

On average a direct cremation in Florida can start around $1000, which is much less than what a cremation in Florida would cost. Additionally, during the time of COVID, it does not make much sense to have a cremation or burial due to social distancing rules. It is important to note, no cremation will occur less than about 5-7 business days. This is due to a medical examiner looking over what the doctors notes are about the cause of death.

At Going Home Cremations, we can help you arrange a direct cremation for your loved one in Florida.

 

Scatterings Ashes in Florida: Rules and Where to Scatter

At Going Home Cremations, we offering cremation for your loved ones. Once a cremation is finished you have the option of scattering ashes. There are a few regulations around scattering cremation ashes in Florida.

In Florida, there are no state laws or restrictions on where you can keep or scatter ashes. If you decide to scatter ashes of a loved one, there are many options available in Florida. The cremation process makes it so a person are harmless, and there are no health risks related to scattering ashes. Even when it comes to a COVID related death, once a person has been cremated, there are no issues with scattering cremated ashes.

Even though Florida doesn’t have laws regarding scattering ashes, certain cities and counties within the state may have their own rules. Also, state parks and national parks have their own rules and there are federal guidelines to follow related to scattering ashes at sea. It is recommended to contact the local public authority before scattering ashes to make sure they do not have special regulations or procedures.

Options to scatter ashes in Florida:

As Sea: Scattering ashes at sea is a very popular way to scatter ashes in Florida. At Going Home Cremation, we can guide you in the rules and regulations of scattering ashes in the sea. We also offer additional packages for scattering ashes in the sea in Florida. The EPA requires that it be notified of a scattering at sea within 30 days of it occurring. You can call the EPA or go to their website and fill out a simple form before scattering. Federal law requires that ashes are to be scattered at least 3 nautical miles from the shore and it is very important to follow these rules. If caught scattering ashes closer to shore than 3 nautical miles, there can be fines associated with the scattering. At Going Home Cremations, we can offer services to scatter ashes 3 nautical miles off the shore.

When scattering ashes at sea, you can use special biodegradable urns that are ecofriendly and make the scattering at sea a memorable experience. We offer these type of urns, just please contact us. https://goinghomecremations.com/urns/

Private Property: You are allowed in Florida to scatter ashes on your personal property. You are also allowed to ask permission to scatter ashes on someone else’s private property. It is wise to get written consent if you are scattering ashes on someone else’s private land in Florida

Public Land: There are many beautiful public lands available for scattering ashes in Florida. It is important to contact the regulating authorities of the public land you want to scatter the cremated remains on before scattering. There are special regulations for scattering as sea.

Federal Land: For scattering ashes on federal land, it can vary from park to park. Some parks will allow it, some will not. It is common practice to have specific areas allowed for scattering ashes and many parks require a permit before scattering. We suggest reaching out to the governing federal land before scattering the ashes in Florida.

Cemeteries: Some cemeteries have areas where scattering ashes is allowed. This service will cost a fee and varies from cemetery to cemetery.

Air: There are no rules or regulations prohibiting scattering ashes in Florida by air. But make sure to only scatter the ashes and not the urn or box holding the ashes.

What is included in Veteran Cremation Benefits

Veteran Cremation Benefits

It is important to understand the veteran burial benefits that are available to all US eligible veterans. It’s a complicated process to understand all the benefits and it is suggested to work with a cremation facility that is well versed in veteran cremation benefits.

veteran cremation

It can sometimes be difficult to know who qualifies for veteran benefits. ID cards are issued for other military benefits.

Here is a list of basic qualifications:

  • Military members on active duty.
  • Members of the active (drilling) National Guard or Reserves.
  • Retired active-duty members. Active-duty members can retire after performing at least 20 years of active-duty service.
  • Retired National Guard and Reserve members who are receiving retired pay.
  • Veterans who have received the Medal of Honor.
  • Honorably discharged veterans who have been rated as 100 percent disabled by the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) due to a service-related injury.
  • Dependents of those listed here. Dependents include a veteran’s spouse and children.

As a US veteran, there are many benefits that are given to deceased veterans. One of the hardest parts is figuring out how to get the burial benefits our veterans deserve. Some of the veteran benefits are explained below:

  1. Burial benefits available include a gravesite in any of 153 national cemeteries with available space, opening and closing of the grave, perpetual care.
  2. Government headstone or markera burial flag,and a Presidential Memorial Certificate.
  3. Some Veterans may also be eligible for burial allowance.
  4. Cremated remains are buried or inurned in national cemeteries in the same manner and with the same honors as casketed remains.
  5. Burial benefits available for spouses and dependents buried in a national cemetery include burial with the Veteran, perpetual care, and the spouse or dependents name and date of birth and death will be inscribed on the Veteran’s headstone, at no cost to the family. Eligible spouses and dependents may be buried, even if they predecease the Veteran.